00-026-O REPLACEMENT

ORDINANCE NO. __________

AN ORDINANCE DESIGNATING SIXTH AND SEVENTH STREETS BETWEEN IRVING PLACE AND WALLACE AVENUE, IRVING PLACE AND CLOVER STREET BETWEEN IRVING PLACE AND SEVENTH STREET AS A DULUTH HERITAGE PRESERVATION LANDMARK.
BY COUNCILOR GILBERT:

The city of Duluth does ordain:

Section 1. That the city of Duluth does designate, pursuant to Chapter 28A of the Duluth City Code, 1959, as amended, Sixth and Seventh Streets between Irving Place and Wallace Avenue, Irving Place and Clover Street between Irving Place and Seventh Street as a Duluth heritage preservation landmark; said landmark is described in Public Document No. ___________ on file with the city clerk, and is described as follows:

(a) The area within the right-of-way limits of Sixth and Seventh Streets between Irving Place and Wallace Avenue, Irving Place and Clover Street between Irving Place and Seventh Street;

(b) A preservation plan shall be developed by the city administration and approved by the city council for this site as provided for by City Code.

Section 2. That this ordinance shall take effect and be in force 30 days from and after its passage and publication.

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE: The heritage preservation commission at their May 17, 2000, meeting adopted a resolution to recommend the designation of area within the rights-of-way of Sixth and Seventh Streets between Irving Place and Wallace Avenue, Irving Place and Clover Street between Irving Place and Seventh Street as a Duluth heritage preservation landmark site. This designation is based on the criteria for such consideration, namely, Criteria A, B, C, F and G. To qualify for such nomination a site or district need only meet one of seven criteria. This nomination meets five of the criteria. These historic streets are a part of a street system comprising a subdivision built by a real estate developer. This particular material has been determined to be the oldest concrete street material in the state and possibly the second oldest in the nation. It was constructed at a time when the primary transportation was making a transition from horses to automobiles.

In 1995 the state historic preservation office determined the granitoid concrete streets of Duluth to be eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. These are the only remaining streets with the original exposed granitoid surface material. They have been recognized several times in the past 50 years for their longevity and uniqueness. This recognition spans from local to national organizations and agencies. These same entities encourage this designation and the maintenance, restoration and replication, if necessary, to retain at least this remnant of what was once a larger system of original granitoid streets.